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  Social 'justice' warriors reach for their cleavers...

Getting all 'offended' about a TV joke about enjoying the sex and violence in Game of Thrones


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Link Here 11th December 2016
8 out of 10 actsA PC campaign group is urging for the totally disproportionate punishment of the sack for Strictly Come Dancing judge Craig Revel Horwood after he said he liked the sex and violence in the hit TV series Game of Thrones.

Revel Horwood was on the More4 comedy panel show 8 Out of 10 Cats on Tuesday night when discussing the hit American fantasy drama series with other panelists on the show.

Host Jimmy asked Horwood if he watched the programme and he replied:

No, I persevered for the first series until the dragon came on and that's when I switched off.

I liked all the sex scenes and the rape and I liked the cleavers through the skulls and I liked all of that, but I got very bored in the end.

Irish actress Aisling Bea who was on his team, looked horrified.  She said:

When they weren't raping anyone? Am I the only one who heard that? What world are we living in? Oh Trump's world, fine keep going.

Marilyn Hawes, founder of Enough Abuse UK, said she was:

Absolutely disgusted. Rape is the most devastating and vile crime and I would have to question him as a person and his merit as a judge on the Strictly Come Dancing panel, which is a family show.

His comment would have enraged many women and men who have been raped. How could he say he liked that scene? I'm absolutely disgusted.

You cannot have people on a family show with that mindset. I think the BBC should get rid of him. It is so distressing for people who have been raped to hear that.

 

  Go Away...

NSPCC whinges about Pokemon Go


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Link Here 14th July 2016
pokrmon go logoThe NSPCC has demanded that the makers of Pokemon GO introduce child safety features before the game is released in the UK. Peter Wanless, the chief executive of the children's campaign company, whinged:

Given Pokemon's already massive popularity with children, the NSPCC is concerned that basic safety standards appear to have been overlooked.

I urge you to urgently reassess your app and its security and safety features.

We all have a responsibility to ensure that children are protected and as creators of a game with substantive reach, you have a weighty responsibility to protect your young users.

The game lets players capture virtual cartoon animal-like creatures on their phones, as they wander around the real world.

There have been scare stories, though, of criminals using the game to lure players to remote locations and to rob them. In another instance, players following digital trails were directed to a sex shop.

 

 Update: Rum accusations...

Drinks censor dismisses ludicrous whinge from Alcohol Concern claiming that the Captain Morgan Rum label is a cartoon that appeals to children


Link Here 19th June 2016
captain morgan rum Complaint Summary by Alcohol Concern

We would like to ask the Panel to consider whether the Captain Morgan pirate logo used on bottles and other items by Diageo is in breach of Section 3.2 (h) of the Code, which states that a drink, its packaging or promotion should not have a particular appeal to under-18s, and in particular contravenes the guidance that cartoon-style imagery...bright colouring... pictures of real or fictional people known to children or terminology popular with children should not be featured.

It is indisputable that Captain Morgan as he appears on Diageo's packaging and marketing materials is a cartoon-style image with bright colouring. He is also clearly both a real and a fictional person known to children: the popularity of 17th and 18th century pirates with young children is attested to by a wealth of books, films and toys; and the Captain Henry Morgan, on whom the drink's branding is based, is both a well-known historical character and has been fictionalised in a number of stories in print and on screen.

Portman Group Panel Decision: Complaint not upheld

The Panel began by discussing whether the image used on the product range was a cartoon or cartoon-like in style and might therefore be particularly appealing to under 18s. The Panel discussed the image at length and considered that the image was not a cartoon or cartoon like and that it more closely resembled a piece of art or oil painting than it did a cartoon. The Panel recognised that the colours used on the image were of a mature, shaded hue and that the image lacked luminescence or the bright colours that might be appealing to a younger audience. The Panel also concluded that the image was very old fashioned and traditional in style and was reminiscent of Victorian book illustrations and did not resemble any modern cartoons or characters.

The Panel discussed whether the image exhibited any visual clues or similarities to the archetypal pirate image that is commonly used in children stories and would therefore be recognisable by, and appealing to, children. The Panel considered that there were no obvious similarities between the image used on the product and the pirate images commonly depicted in children's stories, such as an eye patch or wooden leg, and recognised that the image was of in fact of a 17th Century Sea Captain and not a pirate.

Considering the lack of resemblance between the Captain Morgan image and archetypal pirate commonly used in children's stories, the old fashioned and adult style of illustration and muted colours used, the Panel concluded that it did not breach Code rule 3.2(h).